New Zealand Closing Tax Loopholes

August 4, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

Taxes in New ZealandWELLINGTON – The options for multinationals trying to dodge taxes in New Zealand are numbered, as the local government proposes new measures to tackle tax dodging.

On August 4th the government of New Zealand confirmed its plans to tackle tax avoidance of multinational businesses by introducing several new anti-avoidance measures.

The government hopes to see an extra NZD 200 million in extra taxes drawn from large multinational companies.

It is expected that the focus of any changes would be targeted at tech firms, which have recently been in the international spotlight for their tax behaviours.

The proposed changes revolve around stopping international parent companies charging exorbitant interest rates to their New Zealand subsidiaries; elimination of artificial arrangements which allow c...

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NZ Researchers Say Double Tax Hikes on Cigarettes

August 2, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

Smokefree NZWELLINGTON – New Zealand needs to double-down on its fight against smoking, if it wants to reach its goal of a smoke-free nation.

The result of joint research conducted by the University of Otago in New Zealand and the health advocacy group H?pai te Hauora have led to a push for a doubling of the tax hikes on tobacco products sold in New Zealand.

Currently, the tax rate on tobacco in New Zealand is scheduled to be increased by 10 percent per year on January 1st, until 2020.

The hikes are part of the government’s “Smokefree 2025” strategy, which is intended to see a reduction in smoking rates in the country, to the point where less than 5 percent of New Zealanders are smokers by 2025.

The researchers are now claiming that in order to meet the goal, the government will need to incre...

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Audits Scare Businesses into Paying Tax

August 1, 2017 International Tax Cooperation

Tax auditWASHINGTON D.C. – Business can be scared into paying more tax, simply by being shown the likelihood of being audited.

Statistical information about the possibility and repercussions of audits can scare businesses into paying more tax, according to the results of new research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The results were derived by a team of researchers who worked with the Internal Revenue Service of Uruguay to send letters to more than 20 000 companies across the country.

The companies received letters either providing generic information about taxes and audits, or a letter containing information about the statistical probability of being audited, and the likely penalties from the audit.

The researchers found that the letters presenting statistical information ...

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Panama Papers Scare Pakistan’s PMs into Compliance

July 28, 2017 Taxation in Pakistan

Pakistan taxISLAMABAD – MPs in Pakistan have started to report their full incomes and pay their full tax obligations, with some MPs reporting a 3 900 percent spike in payments.

Parliamentarians in Pakistan are owning up to the extent of their personal incomes and declaring levels which are closer to the truth in the new Parliamentarian Tax Directory released earlier this week.

The Parliamentarian Tax Directory is a recent initiative aimed at encouraging PMs to declare and pay their full tax obligations.

It is believed that the cause of the spike in tax payments is a combination of the efforts made by the government to encourage tax compliance and the after-effects of the infamous Panama Papers scandal.

It is thought the increasing likelihood of illicit tax behaviour coming to light has scared some p...

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Electric Cars Will Lead to Tax Changes

July 27, 2017 Taxation in UK

electric cars in the UKLONDON – Electric cars may be good for the environment, but they will not be good for the UK’s tax revenues.

Taxation and car experts in the UK have come forward to warn that the government will need to implement new car taxes in the future.

The warning has come within days of the government of the UK announcing that by 2040 all new vehicles purchased in the country will need to be electric.

Currently, approximately 65 percent of the purchase price of fuel in the UK is made up of taxation, in the form of VAT and fuel duties.

As an increasing number of consumers switch to electric vehicles, the revenues drawn from fuel sales will fall.

It is estimated that for every GBP 1 spent on charging a car, the government will earn approximately GBP 0.05.

Further, as home solar-arrays become more rel...

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