Category International Tax Cooperation

OECD Says Tax Emissions More

February 15, 2018 International Tax Cooperation

tax on emissionsWASHINGTON D.C. – Developed countries around the globe are not taxing polluters enough to compensate for the harm they are doing to the environment.

The OECD has issued a new report which states that governments around the world are not using taxes to effectively slow down climate change.

Taxes are claimed to be an effective means of encouraging emitters to reduce their emissions levels or to move towards cleaner energy or more energy efficient products and methods.

However, an analysis of the taxes on emissions across 42 OECD and G20 countries between 2012 and 2015 indicated that such taxes are underutilized.

Aside from taxes on road transport, nearly 81 percent of emissions were untaxed in 2015.

The emissions which were taxed were taxed at less than EUR 30 per tonne of carbon dioxide...

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Meat Tax on the Way

December 12, 2017 International Tax Cooperation

taxing meatLONDON – Meat production is too damaging to the environment to remain untaxed.

In a press release issued on November 11th, the investor advocacy group Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR) warned that there is a very high chance that governments around the world will introduce a tax on meats in the near future.

The group claimed that the likelihood of a tax on meat will increase with the global implementation of the Paris Agreement, which will place stringent requirements on environmentally damaging practices and substances.

The impact of the Agreement may be to increase the effective cost and difficulty of raising animals for meat.

It was argued that it is becoming “increasingly probable” that some governments will choose to tax meat in a similar fashion to sugars, tobacco, or ...

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Tax the Rich, Says IMF

October 12, 2017 International Tax Cooperation

IMF wealth taxWASHINGTON D.C – Even the IMF has now come forward to say that income inequality is a problem and that taxing wealthy individuals is one of the solutions.

On October 12th the International Monetary Fund issued the results of new research, calling for taxes to be raised on the incomes and assets of wealthy taxpayers.

It was claimed that since 1981, the average top tax rates on income in the OECD have fallen from approximately 62 percent to a new low of 35 percent.

However, over the same period of time, the accumulated wealth of the top 5 percent of earners have steadily increased.

The Fund claimed that income inequality around the world is increasing, and a significant shift of taxes towards the wealth and incomes of wealthy individuals will be a key to reducing inequality in the OECD.

Fu...

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P2P Taxes Must be Considered Now

August 11, 2017 International Tax Cooperation

p2p taxationWASHINGTON D.C. – Governments can longer ignore the growing influence of the global P2P economy and must choose how they will tax such businesses in the future.

The International Monetary Fund has released a new working paper which prompts governments around the world to consider the taxation measures that they will implement in regards to P-2-P economies and businesses.

Over the last several years, peer-to-peer businesses have played an increasingly important role in the economy.

However, the nature of peer-to-peer business means that the fundamentals of taxation that governments have relied on for decades are now being disrupted.

It was noted that the disruption comes from the comparative ease of avoiding tax obligations on incomes earned through P2P activity.

Further, P2P businesses ...

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Audits Scare Businesses into Paying Tax

August 1, 2017 International Tax Cooperation

Tax auditWASHINGTON D.C. – Business can be scared into paying more tax, simply by being shown the likelihood of being audited.

Statistical information about the possibility and repercussions of audits can scare businesses into paying more tax, according to the results of new research published by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The results were derived by a team of researchers who worked with the Internal Revenue Service of Uruguay to send letters to more than 20 000 companies across the country.

The companies received letters either providing generic information about taxes and audits, or a letter containing information about the statistical probability of being audited, and the likely penalties from the audit.

The researchers found that the letters presenting statistical information ...

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