Category Taxation In Europe

German Tax Court Dictates a Good Breakfast

October 5, 2017 Taxation in Germany

Taxes on breakfastBERLIN – A tax court in Germany has dictated what constitutes a breakfast, saying that bread without toppings does not make the cut.

The tax court of Muenster in Germany have recently ruled that bread and coffee do not count as breakfast, at least for the purposes of calculating tax obligations.

The question of the definition of breakfast arose due to a tax dispute with a local company over food given away on the business premises.

The company, a tech firm, would routinely provide free coffee and bread rolls to employees and customers.

The tax authorities claimed that the food constituted breakfast, and therefore should be treated as a complimentary meal, and taxed as such.

However, the tax court ruled that in order for the foods to be regarded as a breakfast, the bread would need to hav...

Read More

Ireland Chasing Down Deficit Gap

October 4, 2017 Taxation in EU

Tax revenue in IrelandDUBLIN – Ireland’s tax collection level is below the mark set by the government, but it seems that the chances of closing the gap are realistic.

On October 3rd the Minister of Finance of Ireland stated that the tax shortfall seen so far through this year has narrowed, and that the deficit could even be eliminated by the end of the year.

The tax revenues collected by the Ministry of Finance have been above target for several years, however, this year has proven to be an exception, with a drop in collections.

In April this year, the deficit was at approximate 2.4 percent below the government’s own target.

The gap had dropped to 0.8 percent by July, and an even lower 0.7 percent by August.

The deficit has now dropped to a level of 0.6 percent.

It is now believed that the gap could be c...

Read More

Turkey Hikes Taxes

September 29, 2017 Taxation in Turkey

Tax hike in TurkeyISTANBUL – The government of Turkey is instituting a range of tax hikes, raising the rate on personal incomes, corporate incomes, car prices, and lotto winnings.

On September 27th, the Naci A?bal of the Ministry of Finance of Turkey announced that the government will seek to introduce a number of new tax hikes in order to boost the national military budget.

If the new changes are approved, the income tax rate faced by businesses in the finance sector will rise from the current rate of 20 percent to a new rate of 22 percent.

Personal income tax will also rise, with the rate on the third income tax bracket rising from 27 percent to 30 percent.

The taxes on motor vehicles will also rise significantly, increasing by 40 percent.

Further, the taxes on cars will see an extra levy charged next ...

Read More

UK Facing Major Backlash on APD

September 25, 2017 Taxation in UK

Emirates APDLONDON – International airlines are gearing up to fight the UK government over its excessive taxation of international flights.

Over the last week, two international airlines joined a campaign calling for the government of the UK to drop its Air Passenger Duty, or to at least cut the rate.

Currently, any passenger flying out of the UK or the Isle of Man is required to pay an Air Passenger Duty at a rate of GBP for economy seats, and GBP 26 for all other classes.

The rate applies to flights of less than 2 000 miles, with longer flights, or flights on private jets, being set at GBP 75 for less than 2 000 miles, and GBP 150 for over 2 000 miles.

The rates are expected to rise in November this year to approximately GBP 78 and GBP 156 for the longer flights.

The campaign to either cut the ra...

Read More

France to Tax Netflix and YouTube

September 22, 2017 Taxation in France

Netflix TaxPARIS – Online video providers in France are about to be slapped with a tax, which will fund the development and filming of new local media content.

France has received tentative approval to implement a tax on the revenues garnered by online video services which have French viewers, even in cases where the company is not established or registered in France.

The tax will be levied at a rate of 2 percent on the revenues from subscription-based services, such as Netflix.

Further, video-sharing sites with no subscriptions, such as YouTube, will be taxed based on their advertising revenues from French viewers.

The funds from the tax will be used to fund the French film board, which will then go on to subsidies local original media content, such as TV shows, video games, and movies.

The film ...

Read More