Category Taxation In Europe

Heavy EVs To Be Taxed in Norway

October 17, 2017 Taxation in Norway

Tesla taxOSLO – Heavy teslas will soon be taxed more to compensate for the damage they cause to roads in Norway.

Last week it was unveiled that Norway was evaluating the possibility of introducing a tax on electric vehicles, as part of the 2018 national budget.

Currently, Norway is regarded as being one of the most EV-friendly countries in the world, with significant tax and infrastructural advantages for EV owners.

It is estimated that there are approximately 215.6 electric and hybrid cars in the country for every 10 000 residents.

Further, approximately 35 percent of new cars sold in Norway now are at least partially electrified.

The new tax would be levied as a one-time fee for the registration of an electric vehicle which exceeds 2 tonnes in weight.

Experts have estimated that the measure w...

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UK Must Drop Whisky Tax

October 13, 2017 Taxation in UK

Tax on whiskyLONDON – Taxes of spirits need to be dropped, as they are leading to a loss of tax revenues and sales.

The Scotch Whisky Association is calling on the government of the UK to drop the rate of duties applied to the sale of whisky.

The Association is claiming that the recent increase in the rate of the duty has resulted in a decrease in the number of bottles being sold, and, subsequently, a drop in the tax revenues gathered by the government.

Over the first six months of 2017, approximately 36.7 million bottles were sold in the UK, however, over the same period in 2016 a total of 37.7 million were sold.

The result of the decreased sales outweighed the relative increase in tax collected per bottle, with overall revenues from the sale of spirits between April and June this year dropping by ...

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German Tax Court Dictates a Good Breakfast

October 5, 2017 Taxation in Germany

Taxes on breakfastBERLIN – A tax court in Germany has dictated what constitutes a breakfast, saying that bread without toppings does not make the cut.

The tax court of Muenster in Germany have recently ruled that bread and coffee do not count as breakfast, at least for the purposes of calculating tax obligations.

The question of the definition of breakfast arose due to a tax dispute with a local company over food given away on the business premises.

The company, a tech firm, would routinely provide free coffee and bread rolls to employees and customers.

The tax authorities claimed that the food constituted breakfast, and therefore should be treated as a complimentary meal, and taxed as such.

However, the tax court ruled that in order for the foods to be regarded as a breakfast, the bread would need to hav...

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Ireland Chasing Down Deficit Gap

October 4, 2017 Taxation in EU

Tax revenue in IrelandDUBLIN – Ireland’s tax collection level is below the mark set by the government, but it seems that the chances of closing the gap are realistic.

On October 3rd the Minister of Finance of Ireland stated that the tax shortfall seen so far through this year has narrowed, and that the deficit could even be eliminated by the end of the year.

The tax revenues collected by the Ministry of Finance have been above target for several years, however, this year has proven to be an exception, with a drop in collections.

In April this year, the deficit was at approximate 2.4 percent below the government’s own target.

The gap had dropped to 0.8 percent by July, and an even lower 0.7 percent by August.

The deficit has now dropped to a level of 0.6 percent.

It is now believed that the gap could be c...

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Turkey Hikes Taxes

September 29, 2017 Taxation in Turkey

Tax hike in TurkeyISTANBUL – The government of Turkey is instituting a range of tax hikes, raising the rate on personal incomes, corporate incomes, car prices, and lotto winnings.

On September 27th, the Naci A?bal of the Ministry of Finance of Turkey announced that the government will seek to introduce a number of new tax hikes in order to boost the national military budget.

If the new changes are approved, the income tax rate faced by businesses in the finance sector will rise from the current rate of 20 percent to a new rate of 22 percent.

Personal income tax will also rise, with the rate on the third income tax bracket rising from 27 percent to 30 percent.

The taxes on motor vehicles will also rise significantly, increasing by 40 percent.

Further, the taxes on cars will see an extra levy charged next ...

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