Category Taxation In Europe

British Newspapers Wants Facebook Tax

September 26, 2018 Taxation in UK

media license feeLONDON – British newspapers need to take back some of the money flowing to Facebook and Google, according to an industry body.

On September 25th the UK News Media Association (NMA) issued a press release calling for large internet companies to pay a license fee to fund journalism in the UK.

The NMA is claiming that “tech giants” such as Google and Facebook are seeing an increase in revenues from advertising derived by hosting and displaying articles and journalism made by UK journalist.

As the advertising revenues is “…now flowing to the global search engines and social media companies who make no meaningful contribution to the cost of producing the original content from which they so richly benefit,” revenues for publishers is plummeting.

In the 10 years between 2007 and 2017...

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Drones Spying on Greek Tax Dodgers

September 25, 2018 Taxation in Greece

drones and taxesSANTORINI – Drones have been used to spy on tour boats in Greece.

Greek tax authorities have used drones to monitor tax compliance in Santorini.

The recent use of drones is part of an experiment by tax authorities to catch out tax dodgers in the popular tourist destination.

The drones followed and recorded nine separate tour boats, and evidence was collected on the number of paying passengers the boat had.

Tax authorities compared the information they gathered on vide against the declared receipts and revenues provided by the boat-operators.

It was shown that the boat-operators under-declared their incomes by approximately EUR 29 460.

Tax authorities claim that they have increased the extent and number of inspections that they are conducting in tourist-heavy areas.

Greece is highly reli...

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Netherlands Speed Cameras Become Tax Traps

September 24, 2018 Taxation in Netherlands

Dutch road taxAMSTERDAM – Dutch authorities will use an extensive camera network to see who is driving their car without paying tax.

Late last week Dutch media revealed that tax authorities will soon be monitoring all cars on the road to determine who is and who is not paying road taxes.

The Netherlands has an extensive array of cameras throughout the national roading network, both in the form of regular speed cameras and 800 specialized “ANPR” cameras used to monitor road conditions.

The cameras will be used by the tax authorities to see what cars are on the road, and reconcile the information against the information it has about who has paid their road taxes.

The monitoring of car use is expected to raise as much as EUR 10 million in extra tax revenues each year.

Previously authorities had used...

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Irish Authority Tacking Down Airbnb Incomes

September 19, 2018 Taxation in Ireland

airbnb in irelandDUBLIN – 12 000 taxpayers in Ireland are being asked if they have paid all taxes owing on their Airbnb incomes.

The Revenue Commissioners of Ireland is sending out letters to thousands of homeowners in the country who are using Airbnb to rent out their properties.

As many as 12 000 taxpayers across the country will soon receive letters reminding them that if they rented out their properties on the popular short-term letting site they may be liable to pay taxes on any of their derived incomes.

Any incomes made from Airbnb must be declared, or the taxpayer will be liable to pay fines and penalties on top of the owing interest.

The letters are being sent based on information obtained from Airbnb regarding rentals over the course of 2014, 2015, and 2016.

Neither the Revenue Commissioners ...

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France Eases Back From Exit Tax

September 17, 2018 Taxation in France

France Exit TaxPARIS – France is watering down its punitive tax on the assets of wealthy individuals who leave the country.

The government of France is altering the conditions of its infamous “exit tax” and limiting the conditions under which ex-taxpayers of France are liable to pay a tax on the capital appreciation of their assets.

Previously, individuals who left France, and subsequently transferred their domicile for tax purposes, were liable to face an effective tax rate of 30 per cent on their capital gains for a period of 15 years.

The time limit for the tax has now been shifted to a mere 2 years.

The tax is applicable to individuals who have previously lived in France for 6 consecutive years, and have either a 50 per cent shareholding in a company moved to France or at least EUR 800 000 in ...

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