Category Taxation in Asia-Pacific

NZ Cracks Down on Tax Avoiders

December 8, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

New Zealand tax rulesWELLINGTON – New Zealand may soon step up against large multinational businesses arranging their affairs to skip paying taxes in the country.

On December 8th the Taxation (Neutralising Base Erosion and Profit Shifting) Bill was introduced into parliament in New Zealand.

The bill will, if approved, help control the occurrence of tax evasion and avoidance committed in New Zealand by multinational companies.

The newly proposed rules are based on similar rules enacted and proposed around the world for combating tax evasion and base erosion.

The key points in the bill revolve around aggressive tax planning and the misuse of intercompany loans, hybrid mismatches, artificial arrangements, and illicit transfer pricing practices.

It is expected that if the new rules are implemented, they will lea...

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NZ Tourist Tax Needs Better Planning

December 5, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

tourism NZWELLINGTON – Taxes collected from tourist should flow to regions which attracted the tourists to New Zealand, says tourism group.

In a press release on December 4th the advocacy group Regional Tourism NZ called for “a coordinated national discussion on tourism tax”.

The newly elected Labour government in New Zealand has previously campaigned on the promise of a NZD 25 tourist tax to be paid by each international visitor coming to the country.

However, despite the campaign promises, there have not yet been any confirmed details of how the tax will work, and whether the proposed rate will be maintained.

It was explained in the press release that the growth of tourism in New Zealand is having a disproportionate benefit across New Zealand, with many regions benefiting greatly from risin...

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Singapore Eyes Online Shopping GST

November 23, 2017 Taxation in Singapore

Online shopping taxSINGAPORE – Singapore’s rising government expenditure may soon be financed by a tax on online purchases.

As the spending needs of the government of Singapore grows, authorities may soon look into re-working the current legislation on the collection of Goods and Service Tax.

Currently, any goods or services purchased by a taxpayer from Singapore from an international online retailer, are not liable for GST, unless the cost exceeds SGD 400.

Some experts have suggested that the government may lower the threshold in order to capture more transaction under the net of GST.

While the government has not given any indication of how exactly the changes will work.

However, it is expected that the changes will either require merchants to register for GST in Singapore and collect taxes on behalf of ta...

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Petrol Tax Will Fund Rail in NZ

November 22, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

petrol taxAUCKLAND – Drivers in New Zealand’s biggest city will soon pay more for petrol, with the extra cots being used to pay for a rail network in the city.

The government of New Zealand will soon implement the first regional fuel tax in the country, according to a statement made by a spokesperson for the national Minister of Transport Phil Twyford.

The Minister of Transport indicated that a tax of NZD 0.10 per litre will be applied to the sale of petrol in commercial petrol stations anywhere in the Auckland region.

The current mayor of Auckland Phil Goff has called on the government to pass the revenues from the tax to the Council.

The funds passed to the Council would be used to pay for improvements to the city’s transport infrastructure.

In particular, the tax would go towards paying for ...

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Tax Data Explains Gender Pay Gap

November 17, 2017 Taxation in Australia

pay gap australiaCANBERRA – The pay gap in Australia has been explained using tax data from Australia.

New research published in the book Tax, Social Policy and Gender: Rethinking Equality and Efficiency has used Australian tax data to quantify the income inequality between men and women.

The results of the research showed that women have more interrupted work pattern than men, primarily due to facing a higher burden of childcare than men.

Due to the interrupted work patterns, the positive effects of higher education for women, have a reduced impact on incomes compared to the impacts enjoyed by men.

Due to the reduced impact of education and the significant interruptions to working time, the net incomes of women during their working lives is lower than for men.

Further, as the Australian superannuation sy...

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