Monthly Archives November 2017

Petrol Tax Will Fund Rail in NZ

November 22, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

petrol taxAUCKLAND – Drivers in New Zealand’s biggest city will soon pay more for petrol, with the extra cots being used to pay for a rail network in the city.

The government of New Zealand will soon implement the first regional fuel tax in the country, according to a statement made by a spokesperson for the national Minister of Transport Phil Twyford.

The Minister of Transport indicated that a tax of NZD 0.10 per litre will be applied to the sale of petrol in commercial petrol stations anywhere in the Auckland region.

The current mayor of Auckland Phil Goff has called on the government to pass the revenues from the tax to the Council.

The funds passed to the Council would be used to pay for improvements to the city’s transport infrastructure.

In particular, the tax would go towards paying for ...

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Japan Exit Tax Will Pay for Safety System

November 21, 2017 Taxation in Japan

First Class Check-in Counter at NRT Narita Airport - Japan AirlinesTOKYO – Japan could soon have a system to keep tabs on all Japanese tourists around the world, paid for by all the international and local tourists leaving the country.

The Japan Tourism Agency is looking at using the revenues raised from a proposed exit tax to fund the development of a system to check on the safety of Japanese tourists travelling abroad.

Currently, the government of Japan is looking at implementing an exit tax of JPY 1 000 per person leaving eh country on a plane or ship, with the charge to be added to the fare paid for the travel.

The Agency hopes to use the funds to create a system which will centrally manage the records and information about Japanese travellers who are overseas.

The new system will allow the government to easily collect information on the status and...

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Thousands of Companies Skipping Taxes in Pakistan

November 20, 2017 Taxation in Pakistan

Pakistan taxesISLAMABAD – While Pakistan’s biggest companies are paying a significant portion of all taxes, thousands of small companies are skipping all of their obligations.

According to information in Pakistan’s recently published Tax Directory 2016, approximately 40 percent of companies in Pakistan did not pay any taxes despite filing tax returns.

In total, 79 700 tax returns were filed by companies and partnerships, with 31 364 companies, and the remainder being made up by partnerships.

The Tax Directory shows that of the businesses that did file returns, approximately 33 000 did not pay any taxes at all.

However, it is noted that the non-payment is an indicator of poor compliance, as the tax rules in Pakistan state that businesses that make a loss must still pay a tax of 1 percent, if they se...

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Tax Data Explains Gender Pay Gap

November 17, 2017 Taxation in Australia

pay gap australiaCANBERRA – The pay gap in Australia has been explained using tax data from Australia.

New research published in the book Tax, Social Policy and Gender: Rethinking Equality and Efficiency has used Australian tax data to quantify the income inequality between men and women.

The results of the research showed that women have more interrupted work pattern than men, primarily due to facing a higher burden of childcare than men.

Due to the interrupted work patterns, the positive effects of higher education for women, have a reduced impact on incomes compared to the impacts enjoyed by men.

Due to the reduced impact of education and the significant interruptions to working time, the net incomes of women during their working lives is lower than for men.

Further, as the Australian superannuation sy...

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Digital Identity Coming for Scottish Taxpayers

November 16, 2017 Taxation in UK

digital identityEDINBURGH – Paying taxes in Scotland is set to become easier under the government’s project to emulate Estonia’s digital identity system.

The government of Scotland is currently researching the feasibility of implementing a digital-identity system for its taxpayers, similar to the system already in place in Estonia.

Estonia currently stores all information regarding a taxpayer digitally, with “pockets” of information being stored and encrypted in a blockchain format.

The various pieces of information can only be accessed by delegated individuals from departments or authorities related to that information.

The information in its entirety can only be viewed by the person in question, or their legal representative.

By leveraging this information collection system, the tax authorities in...

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