More Tax Cuts on Way in New Zealand

June 26, 2017 Taxation in New Zealand

Bill English tax cutsWELLINGTON – New Zealand’s Prime Minister has made a campaign promise of more tax cuts, on top of the tax cuts that are already planned to come into effect in April next year.

In a speech over the weekend, the Prime Minister of New Zealand Bill English indicated that if his party is re-elected in the coming election, taxpayers across the country could look forward to another round of tax cuts.

Currently, the National Party, which is led by Bill English, has promised that from April next year, a series of tax cuts will reduce the weekly tax burden of 1.3 million households by approximately NZD 26 each.

Some critics have criticised the cuts by saying that wealthy individuals and households will enjoy a disproportionately greater tax benefit, though supporters of the cut have said that the t...

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Paraguayan Farmers Protesting New Export Tax

June 22, 2017 Taxation in Paraguay

export tax on soyASUNCION – Farmers in Paraguay are fearing that a new tax could spell the end of corn and wheat exports in the country, while also crippling the vital soy production sector.

Farmers in Paraguay gathered on June 21st to protest a proposed tax measure which, they claim, could shrink the level of exports of agricultural products from the country.

The new tax would be levied at a rate of 15 percent on the export of soy, corn, and wheat products leaving the country.

It is expected that the government could vote on the tax this week, as early as June 22nd.

Supporters of the tax claim that the agricultural sector enjoys an overly beneficial tax environment, and could pay more in order to raise revenue and help fund development projects.

It is estimated that the agricultural industry saw exports...

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Czech Republic Delays e-Book Tax Break for EU

June 20, 2017 Taxation in EU

tax breaks on e-booksBRUSSELS – Taxpayers in the EU will not be able to enjoy a tax-break on e-books until the Czech Republic lets go of a bill it is holding hostage for its own political benefit.

Late last week tensions arose among members of the EU, as the Czech Republic blocked a bill relating the taxation of e-books, as a means of lending more weight to their demands on a separate bill on a proposed VAT pilot program.

The blocked bill is intended to allow EU member countries to introduce VAT breaks for the sale of e-books.

Currently, under EU law it is possible to reduce the rate of VAT on physical books, but the breaks are not extended to their digital counterparts, creating a divide between the taxation of physical and digital books.

The Czech Republic has blocked the bill at its last stage before imp...

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Cutting Air Departure Tax Would Only Help the Rich

June 19, 2017 Taxation in UK

air departure taxEDINBURGH – Scotland’s new air departure tax is not yet, but the government already has plans to abolish it, although the change will only help corporations and the wealthy.

New research recently released by the campaign group Fellow Traveller has shown that the plans to scrap the air departure tax in Scotland will likely provide a disproportionate benefit to the country’s richest taxpayers.

The air departure tax in Scotland is expected to be implemented in April 2018, as one of the first devolved taxes in the country.

However, the leading SNP administration already plans to slash the tax rate in half by the end of its current parliamentary term, with a further long-term plan of removing the tax entirely as soon as practical.

The party claims that removing the tax would improve Scotla...

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Trudea Says No to Internet Tax

June 16, 2017 Taxation in Canada

Canadian internet taxOTTAWA – Plans for a tax on high-speed internet have been quickly shutdown by the Prime Minister of Canada, following a proposal for such a tax by a national heritage group.

On June 15th the Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau stated that the government would not support the recent proposal to instate a tax on high-speed internet services.

The proposal was raised by the Canadian Heritage parliamentary committee, and called for a 5 percent tax to be instated on high speed internet connections.

The tax will be applied to “broadband internet providers”, but their offered basic services packages would be exempt from the tax.

Due to the targeting of the tax, it has come to be called a “Netflix Tax” as it will be more likely to impact high-end users, and not individuals who want acces...

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