Have Babies or Pay Tax, Says China

August 21, 2018 Taxation in China

fertility taxes in ChinaSHANGHAI – China could soon tax people for not having enough babies.

Hu Jiye, a finance professor at China University of Political Science and Law, is calling for the government to use taxes to encourage couples in the country to have more children.

The first of the two proposed taxes is a tax on the incomes of dual incomes couple with no children.

The professor claims that couples like these will end up consuming social resources, as they do not have kids to take care of them in their old age.

The collected taxes would offset the financial burden that the couples may eventually place on the government in the form of health care and social welfare.

Further, Hi Kiye called for the implementation of a fertility fund.

If enacted, the fund would see a tax paid by couples, with the collecte...

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Canada’s Tax Collectors Say the System is Biased

August 20, 2018 Taxation in Canada

CRA CanadaOTTAWA – Canada’s tax workers are saying that their own system makes is skewed to benefit the corporates and the wealthiest taxpayers.

Late last week the Professional Institute of the Public Service of Canada, a public employee union, released the results of new research and survey into the perceptions of tax evasion of tax auditors working at the Canadian Revenue Agency (CRA).

The survey asked approximately 1 700 CRA auditors and other tax professionals their opinions and perceptions on various matters in regards to tax compliance, collection, and regulations in Canada.

More than four-fifths of the professionals agreed with the statement “tax credits, tax exemptions, and tax loopholes disproportionately benefit corporations and wealthy Canadians compared to average Canadians.”

Nearly h...

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Wealthiest Hong Kong Investors Skip Property Tax

August 17, 2018 Taxation in Hong Kong

Hong Kong housingHONG KONG – Shell companies are helping Hong Kong’s wealthiest people pay less to purchase houses and property.

Hong Kong has some of the most expensive property and housing in the world, and recent media reports are indicating that some wealthy investors and buyers are managing to bypass the taxes aimed at reducing house prices.

Under the standard rules applicable for most locals, property purchases carry with them a stamp duty of 15 per cent, or an even higher 30 per cent duty of the purchaser is not a local.

However, some wealthy locals have been reducing the applicable rate of stamp duty to as low as 0.2 per cent.

The reduced rate applies if the property in question is held in a company, and the buyer purchases the company and not the underlying asset.

Share sales are eligible for ...

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Double Alcohol New Zealand Tax, Say Academics

August 16, 2018 Taxation in New Zealand

Alcohol taxes in New ZealandWELLINGTON – Heavy drinkers and alcoholics need to pay more tax to cover the costs they cause New Zealand.

On August 15th the capital of New Zealand, Wellington, played host to a conference organized by Alcohol Action and the Massey University’s Shore and Whariki Research Centre, where several academics and experts called for an increase to the rate of alcohol taxes in the country.

It was claimed that alcohol harm costs the country as much as NZD 7.85 billion each year, in the form of factors such as unemployment, labour losses, costs to the health system, car crashes, accidents, and other health problems associated with alcohol consumption.

In New Zealand approximately 20 per cent of drinkers are classed as light drinkers, and 60 per cent are classified as moderate drinkers, with the re...

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Zambia to Tax WhatsApp and Skype

August 15, 2018 Taxation in Zambia

Whatsapp taxLUSAKA – Zambia wants to charge a tax on WhatsApp calls, in order to collect funds to compensate traditional telecoms businesses.

Earlier this week the government of Zambia announced that it intends to implement a daily tax on the use of internet calling services such as WhatsApp or Skype.

The new tax would be charged at a rate of ZMK 0.30 per day for each device that is used to access the relevant communications and calling networks.

The tax is targeted specifically at calling, and would not be charged if a call-capable network, such as Facebook Messenger, is used but no calls are made.

It was explained by the Information Minister Dora Siliya that the transition by many individuals to digital calls is beginning to prove troublesome for the traditional telecommunications industry.

She fu...

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